Finding the right candidate the first time

Finding the right candidate for an open position in your company can be a daunting task. It’s incredibly expensive to go through the hiring process, and even more expensive to hire and onboard someone who doesn’t work out in the long run.

Save yourself from the headache of making the wrong decision. Use these tips to help you attract and evaluate qualified candidates to find the perfect fit for your team. 

SKIP TO DOWNLOAD

How do you find the right candidate?

Start with accurate job descriptions

The job description that your company uses in the job listing will be the first interaction potential candidates have with the position. The job description can be what attracts them to file an application, but if it is not accurate enough, you might end up with lots of resumes from under-qualified individuals.

This wastes time, so why not make the whole system even faster and more efficient by writing accurate descriptions? The right language sets standards and outlines objectives for candidates so that they know exactly what to expect.

Evaluating candidates

Key qualities to check for

As you’re sizing up job candidates, here are some key qualities to check for:

  • Is the person genuinely interested in the company’s work and the position?
  • Do they treat everyone they meet with respect, and show an interest in what they do?
  • Are they capable of doing the job? 
  • Are they interested in learning new skills?
  • Are they a good fit for your team culture?

Employees with high potential tend to be curious. They want to continuously learn and add new tools and skills to their arsenal of knowledge. This sort of candidate can grow with your company and become an invaluable asset.

Don’t wait too long

Vet candidates in an appropriate amount of time. If you make people wait around for too long, the qualified ones will likely find another opportunity, and you’ll be left with the most underqualified of the bunch. 

Give them a problem to solve, or a project to complete. 

See your candidates in action by assigning “homework.” You can even allow them to set their own deadline if you want to learn about their work ethic and how well they manage their time. 

The idea of giving candidates a project to do or a problem to solve isn’t so much about seeing their end result. It’s a smart way to determine how they develop processes and how they go about finding solutions.

Get feedback from people they meet outside of the interview

Let your staff help you out. You’re not the only one that will have to work with the candidate. Your team can give you valuable insight, and their opinions matter. Find ways for the other team members to interact with your candidate, and let your team know you’ll be asking for feedback.

You’ll not only see a more complete picture of your candidates, you’ll also give your candidates a view of what’s involved in the job and what your business feels like. If the role isn’t the right fit, you want them to decide now, not in three months’ time.

Take references seriously

When reviewing a candidate’s references, make sure they’re immediately relevant to the position. If they’re not, it’s a red flag. Your hiring team should take references seriously, and thoroughly vet the ones the candidate provides, as well as outside sources. Then, factor in what you found out during the interview to get the big picture. 

How do you attract the right talent?

Hiring is a balancing act. You may feel some pressure to fill the role quickly, so it’s tempting to hire one of the first people you meet. On the other hand, you can’t spend months endlessly interviewing people to find the perfect candidate.

At some point, you’ll need to take a chance on a candidate. Nobody has a perfect track record in hiring. But it should be a calculated risk. Borrowing some of the strategies here should help improve your chances of hiring the very best candidate, one who will be around for the long haul.

Like this article?

Share on facebook
Share on Facebook
Share on twitter
Share on Twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on Linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share on Pinterest
Share on email
Send as Email
Share on print
Print Content